CoVID alert
COVID ALERT: Read our study on the coronavirus and HEPA filtration.
Contact Us: (877) 432 - 1247
Shipping Free shipping sitewide: we cover shipping for all units and replacement filters.

Air Pollution vs Your Skin

blank

For decades, studies have cautioned us about the harmful effects of ultraviolet rays (UVR) on our skin. Should we also be concerned about the harmful effects of air pollution on our skin?

It is well known that air pollution creates many negative health effects and has recently been acknowledged by protection advocates.

According to research, air pollution has been shown to be damaging to our largest organ- our skin.  New research has linked air pollution to:

  1. Age spots
  2.  Pigment spots
  3. Wrinkles
  4. Acne and pimples

Some scientists believe that polluted air could be the primary cause of premature aging and skin damage.

When it comes to skin-damaging air pollutants, car emissions are the biggest perpetrators. Particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are the most common pollutants in big cities. 

Even though we are also exposed to other types of air pollution daily such as VOCs, cleaning chemicals, airborne particles, dust, pet dander, bacteria, and mold, it is car emissions that have been shown to have the highest and most visible effects on our skin.

Particulate pollution causes age spots and wrinkles, according to research from the University of Dusseldorf in Germany.  Although skin aging is also influenced by UV exposure, diet, and smoking. The study proved that air pollution is the leading cause of pigment spots on the cheeks, and wrinkles on the forehead and neck.

This is not just a cosmetic and beauty issue. There is a clear connection between increases in particulate air pollution in Beijing and a rise in hospital visits with people suffering from skin disorders such as hives and eczema.

What can you do about it?

While the outdoor air quality in your city is not within your control, there are a few steps you can take to protect your skin from harmful fuel emissions. 

  1. Make sure you are following the appropriate skincare routine. 

The best skin protection against air pollution is a regimen of oral antioxidants (vitamins C and E), washing. Topical use of glycerin, lanolin, niacinamide, and beeswax-based products are also recommended for barrier repair.

  1. Follow the air quality index fluctuations.

If you live in a city where the air pollution index is high, checking it increase and drop is key to better skin and health. When air pollution levels are high, limit outdoor activity.                  

  1. Consider investing in a high-quality air cleaner.

You may not be able to regulate the air outside, but HealthMate will help ensure that you breathe healthier air at home and at the office. Make sure you do some research when looking for an air cleaner. Stay away from devices that use Ozone to purify the air. Ozone at ground levels is very dangerous for your health and can cause health problems.

X